By 2009, just nearly one-third of the 182 million domain names worldwide were enrolled in the United States. The United States is still the largest source of domain names, with more number of domain names. Even today, Internet domain names are intensely focused in only few nations.

In 2009, the top ten nations, the United States, Germany, China, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Canada, France, Australia, Italy, and Japan, accounted for nearly 70 percent of total domain names inspite of the fact that these nations consisted of just 30 percent of the global population. But, more correct criterion of the concentration of a country’s dot-com activity is to evaluate the total number of domain names in a nation compared to its overall number of firms. When analyzing the ratio of domain names to overall enterprises, the United States currently ranks third after Austria and Switzerland.

Even though the concentration of domain names are present within many countries, the dot-com economy is emerging more global. 70 percent of domain names are present in the top ten countries, 42 million are present elsewhere, higher than double the number in 2005. Moreover, most of the U.S.-based dot-com firms have effective customer bases abroad. For instance, Google, Amazon, Symantec, and Yahoo! earn 48, 45, 47, and 42 percent, respectively, of their revenues from out of United States, for a sum of $20 billion in 2007. Indeed, for many U.S. dot-coms, more number of their users are non-Americans. Eighty-nine percent of Google’s page views are obtained from outside the United States and Microsoft and Yahoo respectively and obtain 75 and 67 percent of their hits from abroad.